zombres:

kitoky:

I need you to protect me. Can you do that?

Fine, fandom. You don’t want to gif Mako and Stacker? I’ll fucking gif Mako and Stacker, because if there was ever a relationship that carried the emotional impact of a film, it’s fucking this one. Without a doubt, we saw their relationship from start to finish and it was complete with a role reversal. Stacker protected Mako in Tokyo, and now she’s protecting him on Operation Pitfall. And this scene is just my absolute favorite because Stacker’s a soldier from top to bottom, but here we genuinely see the father that he’s become to Mako and the person she looks up to and the one she gets her strength and drive from. And without words, although the words hurt just as much, they managed to destroy me emotionally with this small gesture, a you-blink-and-you-miss-it moment: Stacker saying to Mako, “Hey. [We’ve got a job to do, let’s go do it.]” A subtle tipping of her chin; a quick, inconsequential shrug of his shoulders, and immediately Mako straightens, squares her shoulders, taking his strength as hers and they’re ready. They’re ready to save the world together. In Pacific Rim: Tales From Year Zero, Stacker comments that young Mako reminded him of himself; “Quiet, serious.” Based on this, I feel like their relationship is significantly based on their body language, and how they conduct themselves around each other. There were just volumes that were spoken about their relationship in this one scene and this one moment that it made seeing it in theaters 8 times in theaters worth it.

#oh god #the way they have their own quiet physical language because neither of them use words unless necessary #she’ll gesture to her nose to warn him his is bleeding #and he can square his shoulders and immediately she switches back from private/emotional mode to lady sword soldier mode #private little reminders and ways of speaking to each other #i just #asdfghj

(via rob-anybody)

notenoughtosurvive:

unamusedsloth:

Nude Portraits series by photographer Trevor Christensen

This is my new favorite thing

(via hellotailor)

america-wakiewakie:

[Please Watch/Listen & Signal Boost] Man Arrested While Picking Up His Kids: ‘The Problem Is I’m Black’ | The Atlantic 

If you’ve never experienced arbitrary harassment or brutality at the hands of a police officer, or seen law enforcement act in a way that defies credulity and common sense, it can be hard to believe people who tell stories of inexplicable persecution. As I noted in “Video Killed Trust in Police Officers,” the dawn of cheap recording technology has exposed an ugly side of U.S. law enforcement that a majority of people in middle-class neighborhoods never would’ve seen otherwise. 

Today, what’s most disheartening isn’t that so many Americans still reflexively doubt stories of police harassment, as awful as it is whenever real victims are ignored. What vexes me most is police officers caught acting badly on camera who suffer no consequences and are defended by the police agencies that employ them. 

The latest example of abusive, atrocious police work posted to YouTube comes from St. Paul, Minnesota, where a black father, Chris Lollie, reportedly got off work at Cossetta, an upscale Italian eatery, walked to the downtown building that houses New Horizon Academy, where he was to to pick up his kids, and killed the ten minutes until they’d be released sitting down on a chair in a skyway between buildings. Those details come from the Minneapolis City Pageswhere commenters describe the area he inhabited as a public thoroughfare between commercial buildings. If you’re 27 and black with dreadlocks, sometimes you’re waiting to pick up your kids and someone calls the cops to get rid of you. The police report indicates a call about “an uncooperative male refusing to leave,” which makes it sound as though someone else first asked him to vacate where he was; another press report says that he was sitting in a chair in a public area when a security guard approached and told him to leave as the area was reserved for employees. The Minnesota Star Tribune visited the seating area and reported that ”there was no signage in the area indicating that it was reserved for employees.” 

So a man waiting to pick up his kids from school sits for a few minutes in a seating area where he reasonably thinks he has a right to be, private security asks him to leave, he thinks they’re harassing him because he’s black, and they call police. This is where the video begins, and that conflict is already over. The man is walking away from it and toward the nearby school where he is to pick up his kids.

So problem solved? It could have been.

Instead, this happened: [See Video Above]

What the video shows is a man who is politely but firmly telling a police officer that she has no right to ask him for identification, because he hasn’t done anything wrong or broken any laws, and is present in the building to pick up his kids. “What’s the problem?” he asks at one point, and answers his own question: “The problem is I’m black.” We can’t see inside the heads of the people who called the police or the officers who showed up, but that seems like a highly relevant factor–it certainly wasn’t unreasonable for him to reach that conclusion. 

His story about getting his kids wasn’t merely plausible, given the man’s age and the fact that there was a school right there–it was a story the female police officer shown at the beginning of the video or the male officer shown later could easily confirm. 

Lollie is also absolutely correct that no law required him to show an ID to police officers. As Flex Your Rights explains, “Police can never compel you to identify yourself without reasonable suspicion to believe you’re involved in illegal activity,” and while 24 states have passed “stop and identify” statutes “requiring citizens to reveal their identity when officers have reasonable suspicion to believe criminal activity may be taking place,” Minnesota isn’t one of those states.

(via rob-anybody)

third-eyes:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

(via billtheradish)

ask-bombastic-blake:

Sass is the best way to avoid getting fined

(Source: nbc.com, via red-riding-hoodie)

"

And if Michael Brown was not angelic, I was practically demonic. I had my first drink when I was 11. I once brawled in the cafeteria after getting hit in the head with a steel trash can. In my junior year I failed five out of seven classes. By the time I graduated from high school, I had been arrested for assaulting a teacher and been kicked out of school (twice.) And yet no one who knew me thought I had the least bit of thug in me. That is because I also read a lot of books, loved my Commodore 64, and ghostwrote love notes for my friends. In other words, I was a human being. A large number of American teenagers live exactly like Michael Brown. Very few of them are shot in the head and left to bake on the pavement.

The “angelic” standard was not one created by the reporter. It was created by a society that cannot face itself, and thus must employ a dubious “morality” to hide its sins. It is reinforced by people who have embraced the notion of “twice as good” while avoiding the circumstances which gave that notion birth. Consider how easily living in a community “with rough patches” becomes part of a list of ostensible sins. Consider how easily “black-on-black crime” becomes not a marker of a shameful legacy of segregation but a moral failing.

"

Ta-Nehisi Coates, being amazing. (via politicalprof)

(via ladyofthelog)

leupagus:


Mutant 101 -
GROOTING
grootːɪŋ/

verb 
gerund or present participle: grooting 
1. to move tree-rhythmically to The Jackson 5.
"his arms grooted like branches in the wind " 
2. move in a quick and lively way.
"Grooting came naturally to Michael Rooker. [X]”


R U KIDDIN

leupagus:

Mutant 101 -

GROOTING

grootːɪŋ/

verb
gerund or present participle: grooting
1. to move tree-rhythmically to The Jackson 5.
"his arms grooted like branches in the wind "
2. move in a quick and lively way.
"Grooting came naturally to Michael Rooker. [X]”

R U KIDDIN

leupagus:

dustyanswer:

why don’t you crush what’s left of my soul - 15/25

Phryne & Jack - Miss Fisher’s murder mysteries

I search for the words of poets and philosophers to explicate the emotions that roil within me at this moment, and the only cry I find in my hollow heart is thus:

y

u

do

dis